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Archive for the tag “David Ortiz”

The 2013 Red Sox and the difficulty of moving on

photo via washintonpost.com

“Nobody in here is wearing the … World Series champ shirts, you don’t even see anything like that in here. Forget that.” – Jonny Gomes

The 2014 Red Sox seem perfectly content moving on, not forgetting their miraculous run to a World Series title, but putting it aside to savor at a later date.

I wish I could do the same.

In 2013, the Red Sox won 97 games and and the American League East. In the ALDS, they outpitched the Rays who produce quality young arms in their sleep. The Tigers, despite stifling Red Sox bats for the majority of six games, couldn’t capture the American League crown. Boston was too timely, too clutch. They beat the Tigers with good starting pitching, big hits in big spots, and a bullpen that flexed its muscle all series long. The Fall Classic was a wild series between two of baseball’s powerhouses. In the end, David Ortiz and Jon Lester were too much for the St. Louis Cardinals. The two former champions smothered the birds on the mound and at the plate, proving that the best that the Cards had to offer simply could not match up with the weapons the Red Sox possessed.

And I still can’t believe it. I can’t. I’ve written about how good this team was, how their World Series title was not a uniquely a product of a collection of good breaks along the way. So why can’t I do what Jonny Gomes and the rest of the team — you know, the guys who actually won the damn thing and didn’t just sit on their couch in their apartment in Worcester — are doing?

“It’s no different this spring. It’s not highlight and delete, but our motto is: Turn the (expletive) page.”

It’s fair to say I didn’t see this coming. For me, the 2004 World Series was the most important. It was absolutely vital. Three years later, they did it again, and it was the most fun. I went to my first playoff game that fall. I was in college. It was great. Last season, 2013, was the most unlikely. I simply didn’t see it coming.

Before the season, a co-worker, friend, or family member would casually ask how I thought the team would perform during the summer. My response was simple — I said I would happy if the Red Sox were playing meaningful games in September. I meant it, too. After 2012, I was desperate to watch baseball games that mattered after Labor Day. With two Wild Card spots available and a team that looked like it would be competitive in a difficult division, I believed that contending for a playoff spot in the final week or days of the season was certainly an attainable goal. And then they paid a visit to the talent-laden Dodgers.

The Red Sox left Los Angeles on August 25 after winning the three-game series. They had a one-game lead in the division, and a nine-game home stand at Fenway Park. By the time it was complete and the club landed in New York on September 4, they had a 5.5-game lead in the division. Boston never looked back, building as much as a 9.5-game lead in the AL East. They were a wagon in September, going 16-9 en route to a 97-65 record–good for tops in the American League. The Red Sox played meaningful games in August, September, and throughout October. They met, exceeded, and annihilated my expectations. I still can’t believe it. I still can’t let go.

But I sure am proud.

Red Sox Offseason Notes: Napoli, Carp, Ellsbury

Photo via csnne.com

We are only a couple of weeks into the Red Sox offseason. The World Series trophy is somewhere, presumably in New England–where it belongs. Qualifying offers have been made and turned down. All is right with the world.

Here are some brief thoughts on the Red Sox, free agency, and the 2014 season.

— I think too many fans are underestimating the hole that Jacoby Ellsbury‘s likely departure is going to leave in the Red Sox outfield. Most of us know that Ellsbury is an excellent player. But because the Red Sox have Jackie Bradley Jr. waiting to play center field, some fans believe that Ells won’t be missed as much. Ellsbury was close to a six win (5.8 WAR) player in 2013. It wouldn’t be hard to make a case for him as team MVP. Bradley makes it easier to not overspend on Ellsbury, but he certainly does not fill the void the Oregon native is going to leave.

— My outfield next year has Shane Victorino in right field. No matter what.

— I understand why the Red Sox didn’t give Jarrod Saltalamacchia a qualifying offer, but I think they made a mistake. No free agent in the two years this system has been in place has accepted a qualifying offer. 22 offers, 22 “no thanks.” The Red Sox can afford to be aggressive with their QO’s. They missed out here.

— I would try to find a way to begin the year with Brandon Workman starting baseball games. Ideally, it would be in Boston, but if it’s in Pawtucket, I’m cool with that.

— I owe Mike Carp an apology. When GM Ben Cherington traded essentially nothing to acquire his services from the Mariners, I said that I didn’t think he was very good at baseball. I was wrong. Carp brings legitimate power, a coveted asset around baseball. He slugged .523 in limited time last year. WEEI.com’s Rob Bradford has reported that clubs have inquired about Carp, but the Red Sox don’t want to move him. I don’t blame them.

Daniel Nava‘s OBP in 2013 was .385. Victorino, Nava, Dustin Pedroia, David Ortiz, Mike Napoli are my ideal/realistic top five hitters on Opening Day.

— Where does Joel Hanrahan play next year? I wouldn’t be against bringing him back on a one-year, low cost deal.

Brian McCann should be a target of the Red Sox if he can be had for less than a five-year pact. It’s unlikely that he would sign a three or four-year deal, so I’m passing on him.

— The Red Sox should give Napoli a two-year deal with an option. Defense isn’t especially sexy, but the burly first baseman proved to be an excellent fielder in 2013. Power, on the other hand, is sexy, and Napoli provides plenty. Does he strike out a lot? Sure. But he sees a ton of pitches, gets on base, and fits in well here. Chicks dig the long ball, and I dig Nap.

— Napoli was at Tuesday night’s Celtics game in Boston. He was, reportedly, wearing a shirt.

A Timely Champion: How a game in April told us a lot about the 2013 Boston Red Sox

Photo via wcvb.com

The Red Sox won a game in early April on a cool, cloudy day against a division rival by a score of 3-1. It was one simple game plucked out of the first week of what is a long six-month regular season. There were no extra innings. There were no walk-offs.

Sitting in the right field bleachers on April 8, Opening Day at Fenway Park, I had no idea that the performance I was witnessing would, in many ways, come to epitomize the eventual 2013 World Series Champion Boston Red Sox.

I believe that the members of this year’s Red Sox team genuinely enjoyed each other’s company. Furthermore, I’m confident that the guys in that clubhouse truly cared about one another–a trait that Terry Francona often highlighted as being vital to any team’s success. There is no doubt that the 2013 Red Sox possessed a unique blend of character, camaraderie, and yes, chemistry. Sometimes, however, teams that are labeled as possessing good chemistry often have their talents overlooked. Teams bereft of talent that bulge with chemistry don’t win 97 games, and they certainly don’t win championships.

When an average pitcher does not have his stuff on a given day, there is a good chance that major league hitters will make him pay. Conversely, when a pitcher who is supremely talented, like Clay Buchholz, lacks his usual sharpness, there is still an opportunity to be successful. April 8 was one of those days for the slender righty. Against a relatively tough Orioles lineup that featured excellent hitters like Manny Machado, Chris Davis, and Adam Jones, Buchholz tossed seven frames, punched out eight batters, and earned his second win in as many starts. By all accounts, he was masterful on that spring afternoon in Boston. Here is what Buchholz said after that game: “I didn’t really have one thing that was working the whole day. [I] Was up in the zone, couple of balls hit early that would’ve gotten out stayed in the park. Other than that it was sorta a grind there for a little bit.” Must be nice, right?

Players — the actual guys who put on the uniform — routinely tell us about the importance of chemistry, so who are we to dismiss it simply because we can’t quantify it? Nevertheless, talent, for me, always wins out. Give me talent before anything else. And this Red Sox team provided us with plenty of it.

In 2011, the Red Sox possessed a talent-laden roster. On paper, they looked like an absolute wagon. Theo Epstein and Co. added Carl Crawford and Adrian Gonzalez to a core group of quality players that was already in place here. For much of the season, things seemed to click. The vast majority of the 2011 campaign was actually wildly successful, but no one will ever remember the good days of that summer (on August 9, the Red Sox were 29 games over .500). Instead, fans will recall a dreadful September in which the team went 7-20, relinquishing a nine-game lead for the only Wild Card spot, and, of course, chicken and beer. All of those things may be true, but the focus shouldn’t be on Bud Light and Popeyes. The proverbial finger should be pointed directly at that team’s lack of depth.  Kyle Weiland started five extremely meaningful games (three came in September) for the Red Sox in 2011. The righty was, as you might expect, absolutely awful (7.66 ERA in seven appearances). He last pitched in a major league game in April of 2012. The fact that Weiland played a legitimate role in the Red Sox season and subsequent collapse is rather embarrassing. Ben Cherington, who was the assistant GM of the Red Sox in 2011, had a keen understanding of the importance of depth when he assembled this year’s squad.

On April 8, when Buchholz was finished baffling Orioles batters, he turned things over to Andrew Bailey who looked excellent in his first two appearances of the season. Bailey kept rolling, punching out two of the three batters he faced. Joel Hanrahan pitched the ninth inning of that game, allowing one run. It was clear that the Red Sox had identified their setup man and closer. Of course, no one knew that the pair of hard throwing right handers wouldn’t throw another pitch after July 12.

When a team loses its all-star closer to a season-ending injury, they’re usually not able to replace him with another former all-star who is a proven back end of the bullpen piece. But that’s exactly what the Red Sox did when Hanrahan went down with a torn flexor tendon, and they were able to turn to Bailey. Ultimately and somewhat unsurprisingly, Bailey was lost for the season and required surgery to repair his shoulder. John Farrell turned briefly to Junichi Tazawa before handing the keys to the car over to Koji Uehara on June 26. Uehara never gave them back as he accumulated 21 regular season saves and seven in the postseason. He made sure to collect hundreds of high fives along the way.

There is no doubt that Cherington knew what he was doing when he added Hanrahan and Uehara to a bullpen that already had two guys who possessed arsenals that lend themselves to the closer role. Bailey was a proven closer, and Tazawa is an excellent pitcher who rarely walks a batter and has the ability to throw in the mid-90’s. Heading into the season, a case could be made that there was some redundancy in the Red Sox bullpen, but, because of that depth, they were able to overcome attrition and turn what easily could have evolved into a weakness into a legitimate strength.

Depth is something that general managers can build. To a certain extent, they can control it. Could Cherington have splurged, gone out and signed a sexy free agent, like Josh Hamilton? You bet. But it would have limited his ability to infuse talent around the diamond and build depth in certain areas. David Ross, Jonny Gomes, and Uehara are three good examples of players who Cherington could have simply passed on without getting a ton of pushback from the fanbase. Timeliness, on the other hand, is a characteristic that general managers do not have much control over, but most good teams seem to find a way to come up large in big spots.

Wei-Yin Chen was matching Buchholz blow for blow, frame after frame. The Red Sox offense was essentially lifeless. Chen was dealing. Then Dustin Pedroia led off the bottom of the seventh inning with an infield single. Mike Napoli then jolted a ball to center for a double. Will Middlebrooks followed with a strikeout for the first out of the inning. Daniel Nava stepped in, batting from the right side. He took a ball and fouled off the next pitch. Chen’s third offering was clobbered by Nava. When the ball landed beyond the big green wall in left, it was 3-0 Red Sox. A game and an afternoon that had been a pitcher’s duel in every way suddenly and indelibly changed because of one well-timed swing.

Nava, the man who delivered the deciding blow that day, is a player who likely wouldn’t have been in the lineup that afternoon if David Ortiz had been completely healthy at the beginning of the year. Ortiz would have been the designated hitter. Gomes would have moved out of the DH role and slid into left field against the southpaw. But because of the Red Sox outfield depth, Farrell had the ability to use the versatile Nava in left that day. An undrafted former independent league standout, Nava’s talents are often overlooked because of his remarkable story. In reality, Nava is a very good ballplayer. He finished eighth in the American league with a .303 average, and his .385 OBP was good for fifth among AL hitters. And on this day in early April, Nava was incredibly timely.

The 2013 Red Sox are going to be remembered as an unlikely champion, a group of guys who loved baseball and beards. But for those of us who watched this team everyday, we’ll recall them as a talented, deep collection of players who had a knack for getting the timely hit. Time after time after time after time.

Road Tripping

Photo via cbssports.com

After a 13-0 win, starting the season 4-2, and doing it against the Yankees and Blue Jays, it is tough to complain about the Red Sox. A team that desperately needed a positive start to the season, the Sox have certainly answered the call. I’ll be at the home opener on Monday, and I couldn’t be more excited to watch this team in-person.

After six games, here are some of my initial observations.

Jon Lester looks good. His outing against the Yankees was nothing write home about, but it certainly wasn’t a poor start. He minimized the damage when he got in trouble and gave his team a chance to win the game. The Red Sox offense staked Lester to a lead on Sunday, and he never let the Jays believe they were in the game. Lester is my MVP of the road trip. Here’s why: 12 IP, 10 H, 2 ER, 2 BB, 13 K. Two wins.

— He went 0-5 in the season opener, but Mike Napoli has started to heat up. More importantly, he’s been showing off some of his impressive power. His hip condition seemingly has not affected his play. Nap will head to Fenway with two home runs on the season.

Shane Victorino has proven me wrong. I know that Spring Training (and World Baseball Classic) stats don’t matter, but Victorino was especially bad this spring. Since the start of the regular season? It’s be a 180 for the right fielder. After Sunday, Victorino has collected eight hits on the young season. He’s not slugging, but he’s contributing night in and night out.

Will Middlebrooks has to potential to be legitimate source of power for this team. It’s easy to say that after witnessing him go bridge three times on Sunday, but it was his opposite field home run off of R.A. Dickey that really impressed. He’s a strong kid.

— Don’t let Sunday’s power surge fool you, the Red Sox need David Ortiz back. I actually like the lineup from top to the bottom, but the middle of the order lacks the muscle of traditional Sox lineups. When Ortiz is ready to come back, he will not only help instill some pop in the middle of the order, but his presence will help balance things out as everyone will be able to move down a spot.

Jackie Bradley Jr.’s torrid spring has not spilled over into the regular season. He’s been good defensively is getting on-base, so it’s not like this experiment has been a failure. There’s been some chatter about sending him down to Pawtucket. This is what I wanted to avoid when the JBJ debate was at its peak. I don’t see why you’d want to treat a prospect like a yo-yo. When he is ready, bring him up. And when you bring him up, understand that struggles and slumps are unavoidable. Nevertheless, it’s likely he will be in Pawtucket at some point this season.

— So far this season, the Red Sox have won games started by C.C. Sabathia, Hiroki Kuroda, Josh Johnson, and Dickey. It’s nice to do well against good pitching. They’ll get Wei-Yin Chen tomorrow at Fenway Park.

Peace of Mind

Photo courtesy of bleacherreport.com

“This [expletive] has been driving me crazy. I got no choice but to wait. I hope it goes away soon so I can get back into action.”

David Ortiz is in a tough spot. This offseason, he signed a two-year deal worth $26MM. He is at least 37-years old and is dealing with pain that is related to an injury he suffered last July

We are approaching eight full months since he suffered the injury, and fans are growing impatient.

In an ideal world, Ortiz would be batting third or fourth in a number of Spring Training games, slapping doubles off of the left field wall at JetBlue Park and driving balls deep over the right field fence.

But he’s not.

Instead, he’s undergoing MRI’s, occasionally running the bases, and taking batting practice from time to time. Ortiz is frustrated. He is sore. Quite frankly, he’s pretty pissed off.

“You always definitely need to play in spring training, because you need to see the game action. Whoever tells me they don’t have to play in spring training, I’m calling [expletive]. We have spring training for a reason.”

Big Papi is caught between a rock and a hard place. On one hand, he needs to do everything he possibly can to be ready as soon as possible. The Red Sox cannot afford to get off to a bad start for the third straight year. On the other hand, Ortiz has to be sure that when he suits up for his first game, he is back for good. On Monday, Ortiz admitted that Opening Day may be a long shot.

That’s the bad news.

The good news is that the MRIs he underwent this past weekend revealed inflammation in each of his heels but no structural damage to his Achilles. I’m not close to being a doctor, but it’s clear that Ortiz has been compensating for the weakness he’s felt in his Achilles. Because of that, he has been dealing with a considerable amount of pain. Once that soreness subsides, the slugger will be able to begin chipping away at the roughly 50 at-bats he will need before he is major league game ready.

The Red Sox seem determined to be sure that when Ortiz is ready to come back, he is as close to 100 percent as possible. And when Ortiz is back, he will have the peace of mind in knowing that the pain he felt in the beginning of Spring Training was due to inflammation, not a setback concerning his Achilles strain from last summer. The fact that the Red Sox best hitter has been shut down for a period of time is disconcerting. There is no doubt about that. But the reactions from fans have been a little surprising to me.

This is the same guy who played an absolutely vital role in bringing two championships to this town, right? The 2004 ALCS? Ring a bell? The guy is a God of Boston. You’re going to tell your grandchildren about this dude. And if none of that is good enough — guess what? He’s still extremely productive. Before injuring his Achilles last season, Ortiz posted a 318/.415/.611 line to go along with 23 home runs. He’s pretty good at baseball.

Look, I get the complaints over signing him to a two-year deal, but let’s not make it seem like it’s a five-year deal worth $100MM. He’s a good player, and the Red Sox need him. The best thing for Ortiz, the Red Sox, and us is to be patient.

It will be worth the wait.

Spring Training Notes

Photo courtesy of bleacherreport.com

The offseason can be fun, but it sure is nice to have baseball back in our lives. Real life, reach out and touch it baseball. That’s not to say that Spring Training doesn’t get tedious, for both fans and players. But for now, let’s be happy that we can turn on our televisions tonight and watch live baseball. It’s hard not to smile.

— Lost in the fray a bit this spring has been newly acquired starting pitcher Ryan Dempster. Relative to players like Zack Greinke, R.A. Dickey, and James Shields, all guys who changed uniforms over the winter, Dempster is not sexy. The 15-year veteran is certainly not on the front-nine of his career. The righty does not boast a big fastball that is designed to blow opposing batters away. As a guy who will play the majority of the 2013 season at age 36, Dempster sort of is what he is–roughly 200 innings, 4.00 ERA. But that may prove to be exactly what the Red Sox need. I’m excited to watch him pitch in meaningful games.

— I have been extremely cautious when it comes to David Ortiz and his Achilles injury. When he strained it (over seven months ago), the reports indicated that it was only going to be a few days. As we all know, that quickly changed. Ortiz must be himself this season if the Red Sox hope to contend. When you start hearing that the left handed slugger will be ready for Opening Day, it doesn’t leave you feeling warm and fuzzy. Opening Day!? How about Spring Training games!? Let’s set games in March as a goal before we talk April!

Lately, however, the news has been sort of, kind of encouraging. Doctors have told him that his Achilles is good to go. At this point, it’s fair to say that Ortiz needs the peace of mind of knowing that the injury is completely healed. Has the progress been slow? Absolutely. But maybe that will be the key in preventing re-injury during the season. For the first time in a long time, I’m confident that Ortiz will be 100 percent on April 1.

— Spring Training, as I mentioned, can be dull. The writers can get a bit bored from time to time too. And that is perfectly fine. But Jackie Bradley Jr. is not breaking camp with the Boston Red Sox. It ain’t happenin’. Look, the kid’s good. He’s a mature, well-rounded hard working player. Bradley knows how to get on-base and plays stellar defense. There is nothing not to like about the left handed hitting, right handed throwing outfielder. In fact, I would go as far to say that I believe he’s ready to make a legitimate impact on the major league level. So why not give him the nod at the end of Spring Training? It’s simple: I don’t see the benefit of starting Bradley’s service-time clock when he will only serve a part-time player. Jonny Gomes, Jacoby Ellsbury, and Shane Victorino make up your outfield. Barring injury, count on Bradley playing in Rhode Island, not Boston.

A Final Thought on David Ortiz

Today, the Red Sox and David Ortiz made their two-year deal official. I won’t be discussing whether or not it was a good choice that GM Ben Cherington and the Red Sox gave Ortiz a multi-year deal. It’s a fair debate, but one for a different day. Instead, I ask a question: Can you believe it?

Can you believe that on November 5, 2012, Ortiz received a two-year deal from the Red Sox?

Because three years ago, it would’ve sounded ridiculous.

In 2009, Ortiz hit .238 and posted his lowest OBP (.332) as a member of the Red Sox. He pulled everything and looked totally out of sync. Ortiz truly seemed like he was done. His numbers in 2010 were better but fell well short of what you would expect from the big slugger.

Then something happened.

It could have been Adrian Gonzalez‘ influence. I’m not sure. But Ortiz began hitting the ball to the opposite field with authority, just as he had done during the prime of his career. He was content with going to left field for a base hit. The long-time designated hitter began staying on the ball longer, refusing to bail out and ground to the right side. Ortiz went back to being a force against left handed pitching.

In the three years prior to 2011, Ortiz did not pass the eye test game in and game out against southpaws. He wasn’t selective and certainly was not getting on-base at the same clip that he did between 2004-2007. In the 236 combined games Ortiz played in 2011-2012, he posted an OBP of .407. He was back to his old self.

The Red Sox aren’t going to be any expert’s pick to win the World Series next year, but you can bet that if they find themselves in contention come September, it will be due in large part to Ortiz.

And if someone told me three years ago that Ortiz would be relied upon 2013, I wouldn’t have believed you.

David Ortiz Inks Two-Year Deal

On Friday, the Red Sox and David Ortiz agreed to a two-year deal worth $26MM. He’ll have the opportunity to make an additional $4MM in incentives. Here is my abbreviated breakdown of the multi-year pact.

The Good: Ortiz can still flat-out hit. The two-time World Series champion is back to getting on-base at a tremendous pace. He is back to taking the ball to the opposite field with authority. In 2012, the native of the Dominican Republic posted an impressive .318/.415/.611 line. He blasted 23 home runs for good measure. And it was all done in 90 games.

The Bad: Ortiz played in 90 games last season. He injured his right Achilles’ tendon while rounding the bases on what would be a home run off the bat of former Red Sox Adrian Gonzalez. He is going to be 37 years old in 13 days, and ideally, the Red Sox would’ve continued to go year-to-year with Ortiz. It would have ensured that the slugger remained motivated, while limiting risk for the team.

The Emotional: Big Papi is the face of the Red Sox. He is a legend in these parts and will be in the same conversation with Bobby Orr, Larry Bird, Ted Williams, and Tom Brady when it comes to the Mount Rushmore of Boston sports. He should never not be a Red Sox.

The Takeaway: Would Oritz have gotten a multi-year deal worth the same amount of dollars on the open market? Probably not. Nevertheless, it is a fair deal based on the financial situation of the Red Sox. They can afford to overspend a bit for shorter term deals. The team possesses financial flexibility in the here and now, and it is important to preserve that for the foreseeable future. From a personnel standpoint, the free agent class simply does not offer what a healthy Ortiz can bring to the table–a unique blend of average and power. The Red Sox could have played hardball with Ortiz and his agent, but if a reasonable deal, like this one, could be reached, what is the point? Finally, GM Ben Cherington is in a much better position this offseason than last. John Farrell is the manager, and Ortiz is signed and presumably happy. Both of those problems were far from being solved one year ago.

The Red Sox Take You Into the Weekend

It’s Friday. That’s a good thing. Celebrate by reading a few must-know points on the Red Sox. I’ll keep it short and sweet.

Torey Lovullo was officially hired as the Red Sox bench coach today. The former major leaguer was John Farrell‘s first base coach last season in Toronto. Lovullo is a known commodity in these parts. He managed the Pawtucket Red Sox in 2010. He also interviewed for the Red Sox’ manager job last offseason. Lovullo is a manager-in-waiting, but the take away here is that Farrell is going to surround himself with guys he trusts, knows, and respects. It is a stark difference from what the Red Sox did last year with Bobby Valentine.

— I’m eager to see who is hired as pitching coach. Farrell has a strong pitching background, but it’s important to realize that the pitching coach is the individual who will be managing the staff on a day to day basis. The Red Sox and Farrell must choose a guy who is given full autonomy over the pitchers. Rick Peterson would be a blessing.

— I have a feeling that the 2013 Red Sox are going to be very fun to watch. David Ortiz, Cody Ross, Dustin Pedroia, and Mike Napoli would be a fun core to root for.

— The Red Sox would be smart to stay away from B.J. Upton and Justin Upton. The former is a free agent who doesn’t get on-base. The latter is a good player who is under contract for reasonable dollars, but it would require quality young talent to get him here. Spend your minor leagues commodities on pitching. Or don’t spend them at all.

Advice for the Red Sox: Farrell, Morales, Ortiz

It’s not that these September games don’t matter at all. There is plenty of room for evaluating guys like Jose Iglesias, Ryan Lavarnway, and Ryan Kalish. However, every move that this organization makes going forward must be done with an eye towards the future. The 2012 Boston Red Sox are officially about the 2013 Boston Red Sox

Here are nine pieces of advice for a ball club in desperate need of putting its best foot forward.

—Do what you have to do to pry John Farrell from the Blue Jays. If Toronto’s GM Alex Anthopoulos demands a player like Clay Buchholz or even Daniel Bard (yes, that Daniel Bard), you move on–because that’s ridiculous. Nevertheless, there is no doubt that Farrell should be the top candidate to replace Bobby Valentine.

—Bring David Ortiz back on a one-year deal. I love these tough-talkers who call into radio shows and proclaim how they’re sick of Ortiz, how he’s a baby, and the Sox need to move on. Get real. I wouldn’t necessarily offer him arbitration, but Ortiz has to be the anchor of that lineup next season. And remember: A pissed off Ortiz is a productive Ortiz.

—Sign Cody Ross this offseason and never let him play right field again. Ever.

—John Henry must empower GM Ben Cherington. He is an intelligent, qualified executive who deserves more autonomy. If that means somehow lessening the importance of Larry Lucchino, so be it. Wins are more important than selling commemorative bricks.

—Give Franklin Morales a fair shot to start in 2013. I’d go to battle with that guy as my fifth starter any day of the week.

—Integrate some patience this offseason. The Red Sox have gotten away from their bread and butter–taking pitches, working the count, and wearing down the opposition. You can get away with a couple of free swingers like Will Middlebrooks, but for every young, anxious hitter, you need two players who are willing to take what is given to them. ESPN’s Jeremy Lundblad explores this in more detail here.

—Trade Jacoby Ellsbury in the offseason. Fans will undoubtedly gripe, but it is the best decision. Here is why.

—Find a way to harness Alfredo Aceves. He is undoubtedly volatile, quirky, and, at times, troublesome. But he is a weapon, a guy who can pitch multiple innings out of the bullpen, spot start, or even close an occasional game. If he proves to be detrimental to the team, cut bait.

—Do not be afraid of bad publicity. When discussing the idea of firing Valentine before season’s end, WEEI’s Rob Bradford advocated the idea by saying “rip the band-aid off.” I don’t necessarily agree with firing Valentine now, but Bradford’s point is actually a good one. This organization has gotten away from what is most important: Assembling a quality team that is capable of playing consistently good team baseball. Are there going to be bumps in the road along the way? Sure. Rather than compromising what is best for the franchise in order to avoid a few potholes, hit them head on. Face the music and learn from the mistakes.

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